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Research Grants - 2005


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Research Grants 2005


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left side.

2005 Grant - Tyas

Vascular Risk Factors, Vascular Pathology, and Alzheimer's Disease

Suzanne Tyas, Ph.D.
University of Kentucky Research Foundation
Lexington, Kentucky

2005 New Investigator Research Grant

Studies suggest that many risk factors for vascular disease, such as hypertension, smoking, and diabetes, may increase the likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease. Evidence also links vascular diseases themselves with Alzheimer's and suggests that vascular disease and Alzheimer's, in combination, may exacerbate dementia. However, studies
that examine the effect of both vascular risk factors and vascular pathology
on progression of dementia are rare.

Suzanne L., Tyas, Ph.D., and colleagues will study vascular risk factors, such as hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes, in addition to vascular diseases, such as clogged arteries, to determine their effect on Alzheimer's disease in people more than 75 years of age. The study will build on research that includes more than a decade of extensive annual assessments of cognitive function and Alzheimer pathology in a group of nuns. Cognitive assessments will be used to link Alzheimer symptom progression with vascular risk factors and vascular disease. The study will also examine the impact of one of the strongest known risk factors for Alzheimer's, a protein called apolipoprotein E4, which is found in a only a fraction of the general population. The research will provide the basis for a more in-depth study of the impact of the vascular system on Alzheimer's disease.

Many vascular diseases can be managed by lifestyle and drug treatments; therefore, a more thorough understanding of vascular factors in Alzheimer's disease may hopefully lead to prevention therapies and better treatments.