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Research Grants - 2006


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Research Grants 2006


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left.

2006 Grant - Greenberg

PET Imaging of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy With Pittsburgh Compound B

Steven M. Greenberg, M.D., Ph.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts

2006 Investigator-Initiated Research Grant

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), a condition in which deposits of beta-amyloid form on the walls of blood vessels in the brain, occurs in many people as they age. Beta-amyloid is a protein fragment that also plays a role in Alzheimer's disease. Although CAA can cause no symptoms, it may be associated with hemorrhagic stroke or cognitive impairment in older people. It also may be an underlying cause of certain dangerous side effects associated with immunotherapy or vaccine-like treatments for Alzheimer's. Such side effects include brain inflammation.

Steven M. Greenberg, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues will detect and study CAA using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). PIB is a substance that latches on to beta-amyloid and "lights up" in a PET scan.

Dr. Greenberg's team will first compare the amount and distribution of PIB and beta-amyloid in PET scans of (1) older people with CAA, (2) older people with Alzheimer's disease and (3) healthy older people with no cognitive impairment. They will then test for any association between PIB/beta-amyloid levels in people with CAA and various other hallmarks of CAA. Finally, the team will investigate if PIB/beta-amyloid levels in people with CAA can be used to predict hemorrhagic stroke or cognitive decline. Results of this study could offer helpful tools for characterizing the effect of CAA on the brain and assessing the safety and effectiveness of beta-amyloid-based immunotherapies.