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Research Grants - 2007


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Research Grants 2007


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2007 Grant - Jicha

Telemedicine Assessment of Cognition in Rural Kentucky: The TACK Study

Gregory A. Jicha, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Kentucky Research Foundation
Lexington, Kentucky

2007 New Investigator Research Grant

The lack of access to high quality, consistently delivered health care to rural, underserved and low socioeconomic persons is a troubling reality in today's society. Without access to care, a proper diagnosis and treatment options may not be made available in a timely and effective manner. 

In an effort to generate knowledge that will directly improve the delivery, effectiveness, quality and outcome of healthcare for persons with dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in rural Kentucky, Gregory A. Jicha, M.D., Ph.D., has initiated the TACK Study: Telemedicine Assessment of Cognition in rural Kentucky. Using the existing Kentucky Telecare Network, a network of healthcare resources for underserved populations, Dr. Jicha's study has the following goals: (1) determine if dementia and MCI can be effectively diagnosed via telemedicine, (2) develop the proper tools to make a telemedicine diagnosis possible, (3) assess the effectiveness of educational outreach via telemedicine and (4) examine cultural differences between rural research participants and their urban/suburban counterparts. 

Dr. Jicha hopes to use the knowledge gained from this project to determine if any clinical or demographic features may be unique to rural dementia populations. And ultimately, the project will serve as a model system for other Alzheimer's researchers targeting rural populations.