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Research Grants - 2010


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Research Grants 2010


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left.

2010 Grants - Engelman

Genetic Architecture of Alzheimer-Related Functional and Structural Brain Aging

Corinne Engelman, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, Wisconsin

2010 Investigator-Initiated Research Grant

Many Alzheimer's disease studies have focused on the search for genes that promote Alzheimer risk. This search involves the study of individual genetic variants called single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs. It also involves linking genetic associations with particular characteristics of Alzheimer's disease, such as cognitive decline and loss of structural brain matter.

Corinne Engelman, Ph.D., and colleagues propose to analyze about 100 candidate SNPs that may be associated with Alzheimer's disease. For this effort, they will collect data from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP) study, a large study of nearly 1,000 middle aged people who have a parent affected by Alzheimer's. This data includes genetic information, as well as the results of cognitive tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans. The team will analyze which SNPs are associated with Alzheimer-related cognitive decline, as measured by neuropsychological tests. They will also determine which SNPs are linked to structural brain loss, as measured by MRI scans. This second analysis will focus on brain regions commonly associated with early Alzheimer's, including the hippocampus.

The results of Dr. Engelman's study could help elucidate genetic links to particular Alzheimer characteristics. The work could also identify more precise genetic strategies for preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease.