Donate Now
Research Grants - 2011


Alzheimer's Assocation Research only
All of alz.org
  • Go to Alz.org
  • Research Center
  • AAIC
  • ISTAART
  • Journal
  • Grants
  • TrialMatch
  • Press
  • Donate
  • Contact Us
Home
Science and Progress
Clinical Trials
Funding and Collaboration
You can Help
Stay Current
Video and Resources

Text Size

Small text Medium text Large text

Research Grants 2011


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left.

2011 Grants - Bonasera

Multimodal Monitoring of Functional Status in Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

Stephen J. Bonasera, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Nebraska
Omaha, Nebraska

2011 Everyday Technologies for Alzheimer's Care

Previous studies suggest that mobile monitoring in community-dwelling individuals may be an ideal and inexpensive way to discern functional changes that are missed by existing clinical assessment tools.

Stephen J. Bonasera, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues hypothesize that they will find cholinesterase-evoked changes in the functional status of individuals with moderate Alzheimer's disease using mobile monitoring, but not standard, functional measures. They will also test the hypothesis that cholinesterase inhibition evokes no measureable change in subject functional status.

Bonasera and colleagues will conduct an open-label clinical trial comparing function before and after cholinesterase inhibition. They will identify 40 volunteers with moderate Alzheimer's disease who are either not taking a drug, are wanting to change their cholinesterase inhibitor, or are willing to go on drug holiday for a brief period. After a washout period and the participants are at a stable target dose of a cholinesterase inhibitor, the team will repeat mobile monitoring for 4 weeks and then repeat standard instrument assessment. The study will include average daily physical activity counts, and an analysis to identify user issues that impact device and system usability and accessibility.

This research study will provide the first documented evidence that cholinesterase inhibition improves functional status in individuals with moderate Alzheimer's disease. It will also demonstrate that mobile monitoring can be used in clinical trials to study functional status in individuals with moderate Alzheimer's disease. Ultimately, better assessments of functional status have the potential to significantly change the focus and performance of clinical trials across a broad range of disciplines.