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Research Grants - 2011


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Research Grants 2011


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left.

2011 Grants - Kiosses

Home-Delivered Intervention for Depression in Alzheimer's Disease

Dimitris N. Kiosses, Ph.D.
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University
White Plains, New York

2011 Investigator-Initiated Research Grant

Depression is common among elderly individuals, and is especially common among those with Alzheimer's disease. Currently available drug therapies for depression are effective in fewer than half of affected persons who have both Alzheimer's disease and depression. Among those with Alzheimer's disease living at home, supportive therapy is one approach that has been used to alleviate depression.

Dimitiris N. Kiosses, Ph.D. and colleagues have proposed a clinical trial to compare supportive therapy for depression with a new approach known as Problem Adaptation Therapy (PATH). PATH focuses on both the individual and the environment, including caregivers' services and the home setting. It addresses behavioral problems associated with both depression and limitations in the individual's ability to perform normal activities of daily living.

For the clinical trial, elderly persons with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, depression and limitations in their activities of daily living will be randomized to typical supportive care or to PATH for a period of 12 weeks. The trial will determine which approach is best at reducing symptoms of depression and increasing the individual's and caregiver's abilities to perform common daily tasks. Both treatment approaches will be provided by trained social workers. This study will answer important questions about the best way to reduce depression and improve functioning in persons with Alzheimer's disease and depression.