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Get the emotional support you need

In addition to treating cognitive and behavioral symptoms, advising patients and their caregivers to initiate health care directives and decisions while the patient still has the capacity to do so can ease the burden for the family as the disease progresses.

View more information about earlier diagnosis, research, treatments and clinical trials.

No two people experience Alzheimer's disease in the same way. As a result, there's no one approach to caregiving. Responsibilities can range from making financial decisions to helping a loved one get dressed. Handling these duties is hard work, but resources and support are available to help you.

there's no one approach to caregiving. Responsibilities can range from making financial decisions to helping a loved one get dressed. Handling these duties is hard work, but resources and support are available to help you.

Alzheimer's causes a number of changes in the brain and body that may affect safety. Depending on the stage of the disease, these can include changes in judgment, abstract thinking, sense of time/place and behavior.

As the disease progresses, the person's abilities will change. So situations that are not of concern today may become potential safety issues in the future.

Taking measures to ensure safety at all times can help prevent injuries, and it can help people with dementia feel relaxed and less overwhelmed. Use the tips and resources in this section to evaluate your surroundings for any particular dangers and change them to meet individual needs.
Inflammation in the brain can lead to problems such as vision loss, weakness and paralysis. Loss of brain cells,

There will come a tie when a person with Alzheimer's disease will need more care than can be provided at home. The individual may need to move into residential care, such as assisted living or a nursing home.

Assisted Living

Assisted living (also called board and care, adult living, supported care) bridge the gap between living independently and living in a nursing home. Assisted living typically offers a combination of housing and meals, and supportive and health care services. The federal government does not regulate assisted living, and definitions of assisted living vary from state to state.It In this section, you will find tips and resources to increase your comfort, allow you to remain active, and help you cope. But more important, we hope you will find the inspiration to make your years ahead the best that they can be.

Taking measures to ensure safety at all times can help prevent injuries, and it can help people with dementia feel relaxed and less overwhelmed. Use the tips and resources in this section to evaluate your surroundings for any particular dangers and change them to meet individual needs.

The cost of providing long-term care for a person with dementia can be very expensive. Many people assume that government programs, such as Medicare and others, will pay for it. However, it is individuals and families that typically pay for services out of their own pocket. We have many support groups, at various times and locations. Check to see if there is a group close to you that fits your needs.

Special Events

 There are nearly 15 million Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers providing 17 billion hours of unpaid care valued at $202 billion. Facts and Figures finds that caregivers not only suffer emotionally but also physically. Because of the toll of caregiving on their own health, Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers had $7.9 billion in additional health care costs in 2010. More than 60 percent of family caregivers report high levels of stress because of the prolonged duration of caregiving and 33 percent report symptoms of depression.

If you have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia, or if you are experiencing changes in your memory, this section is for you. The first thing you should know is that you are not alone. There is a lot of help and support available.

 

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Alzheimer's Association

Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's
Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research.