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Educational Workshops
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Educational classes and workshops are available for:

 

Christine Louie, Education Coordinator

206.529.3884 | calouie@alz.org

Family Caregivers

Note: All classes are based on best practices and the latest research findings and are continually updated through the resources of the Alzheimer’s Association. Most classes are interactive and provide practical tips and tools.

 

Healthy Living for Your Brain and Body: Tips from the Latest Research

For centuries, we’ve known that the health of the brain and the body are connected. But now, science is able to provide insights into how to optimize our physical and cognitive health as we age.

Learn about research in the areas of diet and nutrition, exercise, cognitive activity and social engagement, and use hands-on tools to help you incorporate these recommendations into a plan for healthy aging.

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters – 1 hour

What is the difference between typical age-related memory changes and Alzheimer’s disease? How do I know if I need to be concerned about myself or a loved one? What steps should I take if I think there might be a problem?

This class will answer these questions and more. We will discuss the 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s, why early detection is important, and how Alzheimer’s is diagnosed. We will also touch briefly on risk factors for Alzheimer’s and related dementias as well as the role of genetics in Alzheimer’s disease.

Please note: this presentation is appropriate for the person with mild memory loss but not for the person with moderate or advanced memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease – 1 hour or 2 hours

Is dementia a normal part of aging? What is the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia? This class will answer these questions and cover the basics, including risk factors, diagnosis, stages of Alzheimer’s, treatments, and resources. We will also discuss the benefits of early detection.

The one-hour class briefly reviews risk factors, types of dementia, and how the brain is affected by Alzheimer’s disease. The two-hour class covers these topics in more detail.

Please note: this presentation is appropriate for the person with mild memory loss but not for the person with moderate or advanced memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Legal and Financial Planning for Alzheimer’s disease

Part 1 – Legal Planning – 1 hour
Part 2 – Financial Planning – 1.5 hours
Parts 1 and 2 can be requested separately or together.

Legal and financial planning, as early in the disease as possible, are of paramount importance for those who have dementia and their families. This class will provide practical information on topics such as making legal plans that fit your needs, important legal documents and what they mean, strategies for making a long-term plan of care, how to find legal and financial assistance, government programs that can help pay for care, and tax deductions and credits.

Please note: this presentation is appropriate for the person with mild memory loss but not for the person with moderate or advanced memory loss.


Conversations about Dementia – 1 hour

When someone is showing signs of dementia, it’s time to talk. The Alzheimer’s Association Conversations about Dementia program is designed to help you talk with your family about some challenging and often uncomfortable topics around Alzheimer’s and dementia. Some of the most difficult conversations to have are about: going to the doctor to get a diagnosis or medical care, deciding when it is necessary to stop driving, and making plans for managing finances and legal documents to be sure the person’s wishes are carried out and the costs of future care are covered. Join us and learn some tips for breaking the ice and setting the stage for meaningful and productive conversations about dementia.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.



Communicating with Persons with Dementia – 1.5 hours

Improving communication with persons with dementia can lead to a decrease in dementia-related behaviors and distress and to improved quality of life for both care recipient and care partner. This class will help participants learn to understand and enter the world of the person with dementia and implement techniques for improving communication. It will also provide a brief overview of dementia basics.

This class is a component of the Keys to Dementia Care workshop (see below).

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Understanding and Responding to Dementia-related Behaviors – 1.5 hours

This workshop provides hands-on tools for interacting with individuals with dementia-related behaviors that can be challenging for caregivers. Participants will learn to decipher the meaning of behaviors and uncover their triggers, as well as intervene to decrease distress and the incidence of these behaviors. This workshop will also provide a brief overview of dementia basics.

This class is a component of the Keys to Dementia Care workshop (see below).

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.



Keys to Dementia Care – 3.5 hours

Caring for, or interacting with, persons with dementia, while rewarding, can provide unique challenges. This workshop provides practical hands-on tools for relating successfully to persons with dementia. We will provide an overview of dementia and address communication, problem-solving, and dealing with dementia-related behaviors. Participants will learn how to enter the world of the person with dementia in order to better meet his/her needs and improve quality of life.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Preparing for the Holidays – 1 hour

Holidays and life celebrations cause stress under the best of conditions, but they offer even more challenges to people living with dementia. This session explores the causes of “celebration stress,” how it affects the person with dementia, and offers strategies for creating more pleasant and less stressful events. Let us help you to keep the joy in your life, especially at those special times.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.



Living with Alzheimer’s: For Caregivers – Early Stage – 3 parts, 4 hours total

In the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease, families face new questions as they adjust. What does the diagnosis mean? What kinds of plans need to be made? What resources are available to help? Join us for this three-part series to hear practical answers to the questions that arise in the early stage. Hear from those directly affected and learn what you can do to cope with the changes that come with an early-stage diagnosis.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Living with Alzheimer’s: For Caregivers – Middle Stage – 3 parts, 4.5 hours total

In the middle stage of Alzheimer’s disease, those who were care partners now become hands-on caregivers. Join us for this three-part series and hear caregivers and professionals discuss helpful strategies to provide safe, effective and comfortable care in the middle stage of Alzheimer’s.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Living with Alzheimer’s: For Caregivers – Late Stage – 2 parts, 3 hours total

In the late stage of Alzheimer’s disease, caregiving typically involves new ways of connecting and interacting with the person with the disease. Join us for this two-part series and hear from caregivers and professionals about resources, monitoring care and providing meaningful connection for the person with late-stage Alzheimer’s and their families.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Hearing Loss and Dementia – 1.5 hours

People with a hearing loss are often over the age of 65, and their hearing loss can impact their cognition, ranging from being misdiagnosed as having Alzheimer’s due to their inability to hear and pass cognitive tests to being at risk for developing dementia due to uncorrected hearing loss. This session explores the many ways that hearing loss effects people, why that puts them at risk, and offers practical interventions that will help people to cope and thrive with hearing loss.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.



Meaningful Activities: How to Make the Most of Your Interactions with a Person with Dementia – 2 hours

Learn how to engage the person with dementia and create meaningful, personalized activities out of everyday tasks and interactions without adding to caregiving time. This class will also teach participants how to create a portable, individualized activity bag to have at the ready to meet the needs of the person with dementia for calming, sensory stimulation, boredom, and more.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Five Take-Away Activities – 1.5 hours

This session provides the caregiver with the tools to create easy, practical and inexpensive activities for the person with dementia. It focuses on five areas: activity stations, music, reminiscence, food, and the activity bag.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss

Continuing Education Credits Available



Self-Care for the Dementia Caregiver – 1.5 hours

Family caregivers of people with dementia have one of the most difficult and challenging journeys, which often ends in burnout. They commonly feel that it is not possible for them to take time for themselves, even though doing so may be a lifesaver. In this class, we will explore ways for family caregivers to take care of themselves so that they can better take care of their loved ones.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.



Generation Alzheimer’s – 1 hour

In 2011, the first baby boomers started reaching 65 years of age. This presentation explores the impact that baby boomers and Alzheimer’s disease will have on our already overextended healthcare and social services systems. Participants will gain a better understanding of, and ability to plan for, the new era of caregiving that this demographic change will bring about.

Please note: this presentation is appropriate for the person with early stage memory loss and for family caregivers.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Survivor – Dementia Island – 1 hour

Receiving a new diagnosis of Alzheimer’s leaves families stunned, and often lost. Where should I turn? What help do we need? What happens next? Is my life over? This presentation answers these questions, and many more. It provides resources for the support and assistance that will help people to take charge and to navigate their journey with Alzheimer’s.

Please note: this presentation is appropriate for the person with early stage memory loss and for family caregivers.



Sexuality and Dementia – 1.5 hours

All human beings crave intimacy and acceptance; we all need to express our sexuality. Often, however, the people with dementia express their sexuality and their need for human touch in ways that are misunderstood. The result can be negative reactions, labeling, and the withdrawal of the closeness and nourishing touch that we all need. This session will help people to understand behaviors that appear to be sexual and give them the tools to meet the “real” needs of loved ones. It will also address how to assess and respond to behaviors that are sexual, and what to do when those behaviors become abusive.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Staying Safe – 2 hours

People with dementia are at risk for getting lost and suffering other injuries. This session explores why people with dementia have an increased safety risk. It also helps people assess and correct safety problems in the home environment, be able to anticipate and avoid unsafe situations, and be able to react appropriately when accidents do happen.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Safe Return – the Wanderer – 1.5 hours

It is estimated that 60% of people with Alzheimer’s will wander and, if not found within 24 hours, the majority suffer serious injury or death. This session provides information about why people wander, strategies for giving people freedom of movement safely, and how to find wanderers quickly.
Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available


 

Powerful Tools for Caregivers

Powerful Tools for Caregivers provides a practical approach to dealing with caregiver stress, prioritization, challenging family communication and planning. In the six weekly classes, caregivers develop a wealth of self-care tools to: reduce personal stress; change negative self-talk; communicate their needs to family members and healthcare or service providers; communicate more effectively in challenging situations; recognize the messages in their emotions, deal with difficult feelings; and make tough caregiving decisions. Class participants also receive a copy of The Caregiver Helpbook, developed specifically for the class.

 

Continuing Education Credits

Most long-term care workers must complete 12 hours of Continuing Education (CE) each year before their birthday. For information about your specific CE requirements, visit the Department of Social and Health Services website.

All classes available for Continuing Education credits through the Alzheimer’s Association have been preapproved by DSHS. Certificates are provided by request only and credits are awarded based on hours of class time.

 

Professional Caregivers

Note: Our affordable workshops are based on best practices and the evidence-based Quality Dementia Care Practice Recommendations developed by the national office of the Alzheimer’s Association. All trainings are based on the latest research findings and are continually updated through the resources of the Alzheimer’s Association. Workshops are interactive and provide practical tips and tools. Continuing education hours and certificates are available.

Healthy Living for Your Brain and Body: Tips from the Latest Research

For centuries, we’ve known that the health of the brain and the body are connected. But now, science is able to provide insights into how to optimize our physical and cognitive health as we age.

Learn about research in the areas of diet and nutrition, exercise, cognitive activity and social engagement, and use hands-on tools to help you incorporate these recommendations into a plan for healthy aging.

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters – 1 hour or 2 hours

What is the difference between typical age-related memory changes and Alzheimer’s disease? How do I know if I need to be concerned about myself or a loved one? What steps should I take if I think there might be a problem?

This class will answer these questions and more. We will discuss the 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s, why early detection is important, and how Alzheimer’s is diagnosed. We will also touch briefly on risk factors for Alzheimer’s and related dementias as well as the role of genetics in Alzheimer’s disease.

Continuing Education Credits Available



The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease – 1 hour or 2 hours

Is dementia a normal part of aging? What is the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia? This class will answer these questions and cover the basics, including risk factors, diagnosis, stages of Alzheimer’s, treatments, and resources. We will also discuss the benefits of early detection.

The one-hour class briefly reviews risk factors, types of dementia, and how the brain is affected by Alzheimer’s disease. The two-hour class covers these topics in more detail.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Generation Alzheimer’s – 1 hour

In 2011, the first baby boomers started reaching 65 years of age. This workshop explores the impact that baby boomers and Alzheimer’s disease will have on our already overextended healthcare and social services systems. Participants will gain a better understanding of and ability to plan for the new era of caregiving that this demographic change will bring about.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Living with Alzheimer’s: Early Stage – 3 parts, 4 hours total

In the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease, families face new questions as they adjust. What does the diagnosis mean? What kinds of plans need to be made? What resources are available to help? Join us for this three-part series to hear practical answers to the questions that arise in the early stage. Hear from those directly affected and learn what you can do to cope with the changes that come with an early-stage diagnosis.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Living with Alzheimer’s: Middle Stage – 3 parts, 4.5 hours total

In the middle stage of Alzheimer’s disease, those who were care partners now become hands-on caregivers. Join us for this three-part series and hear caregivers and professionals discuss helpful strategies to provide safe, effective and comfortable care in the middle stage of Alzheimer’s.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Living with Alzheimer’s: Late Stage – 2 parts, 3 hours total

In the late stage of Alzheimer’s disease, caregiving typically involves new ways of connecting and interacting with the person with the disease. Join us for this two-part series and hear from caregivers and professionals about resources, monitoring care and providing meaningful connection for the person with late-stage Alzheimer’s and their families.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Communicating with Persons with Dementia – 1.5 hours

Improving communication with persons with dementia can lead to a decrease in dementia-related behaviors and distress and to improved quality of life for both care recipient and care partner. This class will help participants learn to understand and enter the world of the person with dementia and implement techniques for improving communication. It will also provide a brief overview of dementia basics.

This class is a component of the Keys to Dementia Care workshop (see below).

Continuing Education Credits Available



Understanding and Responding to Dementia-related Behaviors – 1.5 hours

This workshop provides hands-on tools for interacting with individuals with dementia-related behaviors that can be challenging for caregivers. Participants will learn to decipher the meaning of behaviors and uncover their triggers, as well as intervene to decrease distress and the incidence of these behaviors. This workshop will also provide a brief overview of dementia basics.

This class is a component of the Keys to Dementia Care workshop (see below).



Keys to Dementia Care – 3 hours or 4 hours

Working with people with dementia, while rewarding, can provide unique challenges. Participants in this interactive workshop will learn:

  • How changes in the brain can affect communication and behavior
  • Hands-on techniques for improving communication, problem solving, and responding to dementia-related behaviors
  • How to enter the world of the person with dementia in order to meet his or her needs and improve quality of care
  • Practical tools that will improve job efficiency, effectiveness and satisfaction
  • The three-hour class can be delivered as three separate one-hour classes. The four-hour version of this class includes a section on delirium in people with dementia, which is frequently not identified and can hasten the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

The three-hour class can be delivered as three separate one-hour classes. The four-hour version of this class includes a section on delirium in people with dementia, which is frequently not identified and can hasten the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Five Take-Away Activities – 1.5 hours

This session provides the caregiver with the tools to create easy, practical and inexpensive activities for the person with dementia. It focuses on five areas: activity stations, music, reminiscence, food, and the activity bag.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Preparing for the Holidays – 1 hour

Holidays and life celebrations cause stress under the best of conditions, but they offer even more challenges to people living with dementia. This session explores the causes of “celebration stress,” how it affects the person with dementia, and it offers strategies for creating more pleasant and less stressful events. Let us help you to keep the joy in your life, especially at those special times.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.



Meaningful Activities – 2 hours or 4 hours

Learn how any interaction with a person who has dementia can become a meaningful, personalized activity without adding to caregiving time. Learn to create a simple, individualized activity bag to have at the ready for each client, with appropriate tools to meet individual needs for calming, sensory stimulation, boredom, and more.

The four-hour version of this class contains additional detail and more activity areas, including practical “how to” guides for food-related activities, reminiscence, music, and self-directed activity stations.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Activity-Based Alzheimer’s Care – 7.5 hours

Activity-Based Alzheimer’s Care (ABAC) suggests that activities are the foundation of care. Every event, encounter or exchange is an activity. The scope of activities includes every interaction with staff members, volunteers, relatives and other individuals, not only scheduled events provided by activity staff.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Dementia and Dining: Strategies for Improving Mealtimes – 2 hours 

The effects of dementia on dining can lead to weight loss and malnutrition, increased dementia-related behaviors, and decreased quality of life. Participants in this interactive class will learn to identify factors that contribute to dining difficulties and find solutions tailored to individual needs. The class will provide strategies for creating an optimal dining experience and maximizing client/resident independence.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Making Bathing Pleasant – 1.5 hours

Bathing can be a frightening and frustrating experience for persons with dementia and their caregivers. This class will help participants learn to identify and prevent the causes of resistance and dementia-related behaviors that can occur with bathing, and make bathing a comfortable and positive experience. Participants will learn the soothing technique of towel bathing.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Assessing and Addressing Pain – 1.5 hours

People with dementia are at higher risk of experiencing unrelieved pain, which, in turn, can worsen cognitive impairment. How can we identify, assess and respond to pain in people with dementia, particularly if they are unable to accurately self-report their pain? This class will address these issues and provide tools for improving client/resident comfort.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Sexuality and Intimacy – Ethical Guidelines for Dementia Care Settings – 1.5 hours

This workshop will help participants understand the effects of dementia on sexuality and intimacy as well as its role in “personhood” throughout life. Participants will learn to utilize behavioral interventions for modifying inappropriate sexual conduct and recognize the impact of attitudes and values concerning sexuality in later life.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Staying Safe – 2 hours

People with dementia are at risk for getting lost and suffering other injuries. This session explores why people with dementia have an increased safety risk. It also helps the participant to assess for and correct safety problems in the home environment, be able to anticipate and avoid unsafe situations, and be able to react appropriately when accidents do happen.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Safe Return – the Wanderer – 1.5 hours

It is estimated that 60% of people with Alzheimer’s will wander and, if not found within 24 hours, the majority suffer serious injury or death. This session provides information about why people wander, strategies for giving people freedom of movement safely, and how to find wanderers quickly.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Developmental Disabilities and Dementia – 1.5 hours

People with developmental disabilities, especially those with Down syndrome, can also get Alzheimer’s disease. The session explores why people with developmental disabilities are at risk, how the dementia presents and progresses, and how to manage the disease.

Dementia training that is tailored to the needs of specific professional groups is available for:

  • Police, firefighters and other first responders
  • Search and rescue workers
  • Professionals and direct care staff who work with individuals with developmental disabilities
  • Long-term care team leaders and supervisors
  • Activity professionals
  • Hospice staff and volunteers
  • TSA employees

Training for other groups may be available upon request.

 

Powerful Tools for Caregivers

Powerful Tools for Caregivers provides a practical approach to dealing with caregiver stress, prioritization, challenging family communication and planning. In the six weekly classes, caregivers develop a wealth of self-care tools to: reduce personal stress; change negative self-talk; communicate their needs to family members and healthcare or service providers; communicate more effectively in challenging situations; recognize the messages in their emotions, deal with difficult feelings; and make tough caregiving decisions. Class participants also receive a copy of The Caregiver Helpbook, developed specifically for the class.

 

Continuing Education Credits

Most long-term care workers must complete 12 hours of Continuing Education (CE) each year before their birthday. For information about your specific CE requirements, visit the Department of Social and Health Services website.

All classes available for Continuing Education credits through the Alzheimer’s Association have been preapproved by DSHS. Certificates are provided by request only and credits are awarded based on hours of class time.

 

Community Groups and Businesses

Healthy Living for Your Brain and Body: Tips from the Latest Research

For centuries, we’ve known that the health of the brain and the body are connected. But now, science is able to provide insights into how to optimize our physical and cognitive health as we age.

Learn about research in the areas of diet and nutrition, exercise, cognitive activity and social engagement, and use hands-on tools to help you incorporate these recommendations into a plan for healthy aging.

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters – 1 hour

What is the difference between typical age-related memory changes and Alzheimer’s disease? How do I know if I need to be concerned about myself or a loved one? What steps should I take if I think there might be a problem?

This class will answer these questions and more. We will discuss the 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s, why early detection is important, and how Alzheimer’s is diagnosed. We will also touch briefly on risk factors for Alzheimer’s and related dementias as well as the role of genetics in Alzheimer’s disease.

Please note: this presentation is appropriate for the person with mild memory loss but not for the person with moderate or advanced memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease – 1 hour or 2 hours

Is dementia a normal part of aging? What is the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia? This class will answer these questions and cover the basics, including risk factors, diagnosis, stages of Alzheimer’s, treatments, and resources. We will also discuss the benefits of early detection.

The one-hour class briefly reviews risk factors, types of dementia, and how the brain is affected by Alzheimer’s disease. The two-hour class covers these topics in more detail.

Please note: this presentation is appropriate for the person with mild memory loss but not for the person with moderate or advanced memory loss.

Continuing Education Credits Available



Conversations about Dementia – 1 hour

When someone is showing signs of dementia, it’s time to talk. The Alzheimer’s Association Conversations about Dementia program is designed to help you talk with your family about some challenging and often uncomfortable topics around Alzheimer’s and dementia. Some of the most difficult conversations to have are about: going to the doctor to get a diagnosis or medical care, deciding when it is necessary to stop driving, and making plans for managing finances and legal documents to be sure the person’s wishes are carried out and the costs of future care are covered. Join us and learn some tips for breaking the ice and setting the stage for meaningful and productive conversations about dementia.

Please note: this presentation is not appropriate for the person with memory loss.

 

Powerful Tools for Caregivers

Powerful Tools for Caregivers provides a practical approach to dealing with caregiver stress, prioritization, challenging family communication and planning. In the six weekly classes, caregivers develop a wealth of self-care tools to: reduce personal stress; change negative self-talk; communicate their needs to family members and healthcare or service providers; communicate more effectively in challenging situations; recognize the messages in their emotions, deal with difficult feelings; and make tough caregiving decisions. Class participants also receive a copy of The Caregiver Helpbook, developed specifically for the class. 

 

First Responders

Encountering Dementia – 1.5 hours

Firefighters – Whether it is during a fire, health crisis, or a search and rescue event, firefighters will encounter people with dementia. This session gives an overview of dementia, explains the special challenges people with dementia present during crisis situations, and gives responders tools to help them successfully perform their duties.

Law Enforcement – Law Enforcement Officers are often called to situations that involve people with dementia, whether it is to find a wanderer, investigate an accusation of shoplifting, or respond to a domestic disturbance. This presentation gives an overview of dementia, explains the behaviors an officer may encounter, and provides tool for responding to those situations in a manner that defuses rather than escalates what can be volatile scenes.


Safe Return – the Wanderer

It is estimated that 60% of the people with Alzheimer’s will wander and, if not found within 24 hours, the majority suffer serious injury or death. This session provides information about why people wander, strategies for giving people freedom of movement safely, and how to find wanderers quickly.



Responding to Dementia for TSA – 1.5 hours

People with dementia often don’t understand or respond appropriately to the security needs of today’s travel. This session helps the TSA agent to better understand the special needs of people with dementia, and how to help them to safely and successfully navigate security checks with a minimum of disruption.


 

Alzheimer's Association

Our vision: A world without Alzheimer's disease®.
Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research.