Blog  Facebook  Twitter


Go to ALZ Site Español 中文 Chinese 日本語 Japanese 한국어 Korean Tiếng Việt Vietnamese About Us Contact Us Donate
Alzheimer's disease information and resources
24/7 helpline
800.272.3900
Share | Print
Text Size Small text Medium text Large text
If You Have Alzheimer's
Caregivers
Safety
Stress Relief
Find your chapter
Find your chapter
Search By State

Safety

Introduction
Safety at home
Wandering
Driving
Travel safety
Prepare for a disaster
Medication safety

Introduction

A person with Alzheimer's can live in the comfort of his or her own home or a caregiver's home, provided that safety measures are in place. As the disease progresses, the person's abilities will change. So situations that are not of concern today may become potential safety issues in the future.

Below are some safety tips. See also the Safety Center on our main alz.org site.

Safety at home

Adapt the home to the person's changing needs. Re-evaluate your home safety measures regularly as new issues may arise.

Tips:

  • Use appliances that have an auto shut-off feature.
  • Install a hidden gas valve or circuit breaker on the stove.
  • Place deadbolts either high or low on exterior doors.

Wandering

Wandering and getting lost can put a person's safety in jeopardy. A person may be at risk for wandering if he or she comes back from a regular walk or drive later than usual; tries to fulfill former work obligations; or wants to "go home" even when at home.

Tips:

  • Have the person move around and exercise to reduce anxiety agitation and restlessness.
  • Ensure the person's basic needs are met (toileting, eating, thirst).
  • Enroll in MedicAlert ® + Alzheimer's Association Safe Return ®, a nationwide identification program designed to assist in the return of those who wander and become lost.

Driving

Driving becomes a safety issue when the person fails to observe traffic signals, forgets how to locate familiar places or confuses the break and gas pedal. A person with dementia may insist on driving and refuse to give up the car keys.

Tips:

  • Ask a doctor to write the person a "do not drive" prescription.
  • Keep the car out of sight. Seeing the car may act like a visual cue to drive.
  • Disable the car by removing the distributor cap or the battery.
  • See our Driving Center for more tips.

Travel safety

Traveling with a person who has dementia requires careful planning and flexibility to ensure safety, comfort and enjoyment for everyone.

Tips:

  • Stick with familiar travel destinations that involve as few changes in daily routine as possible.
  • Travel during the time of day that is best for the person with dementia.
  • Inform service staff at airlines, airports, bus terminals and hotels that you are traveling with a person with dementia and may need extra help.

Prepare for a disaster

Disaster situations, such as a hurricane, earthquake or fire, have significant impact on everyone's safety, but they can be especially upsetting and confusing for individuals with dementia.

Tips:

  • Determine where you will go if you're forced to evacuate. Family, friends, hotels and shelters are options.
  • Have phone numbers of family in case you will need to change locations during an emergency or evacuation; keep in touch with them as you move.
  • Make an emergency kit that includes important documents, extra medications and a favorite possession that can calm and occupy the person.

Medication safety

Medications and how to manage their use safely is a big concern for many older people. For people with Alzheimer's, a doctor may prescribe medications that help ease disease symptoms, address depression or sleeplessness, or treat other medical conditions.

Tips:

  • Ask your doctor or pharmacist to review all medication to check for possible drug interactions.
  • Do not change dosages without first consulting the doctor.
  • Use a bill pox organizer. You may find it helpful to keep a daily list or calendar and check off each dose as it is taken.

Next: Stress Relief

はじめに
自宅での安全
徘徊
運転
旅行中の安全
災害への備え
薬物の安全

はじめに

安全対策がなされている限り,アルツハイマー病の人は自宅やあるいは介護者の家で快適に生活することが可能です。 ただし,アルツハイマー病が進行するに従い,発症者の能力は変化します。 そのため,現在は懸念されていない状況も,将来的に安全性問題となることがありえます。

下記は安全に関するヒントの一部です。 また,alz.org ホームページのSafety Center (安全センター) もご覧ください。

自宅での安全

アルツハイマー病の人の変化し続けるニーズに対し,家を適応させていきます。 新たな問題点が生まれるたび,自宅の安全対策を定期的に見直しましょう。

ヒント:

  • 自動シャットオフ機能のある器具を使用しましょう。
  • ガス機器には,隠れるタイプのガス栓やブレーカーを使用しましょう。
  • 外に続くドアの上下に戸締り用ボルトをつけましょう。

徘徊

徘徊し,迷ってしまうことはアルツハイマー病の人の安全性を危険にさらします。 普段の散歩やドライブからいつもよりも遅く戻ってくるようになったり,以前の職での仕事を遂行しようとしたり,自宅にいるときでも「家に帰ろう」としたがるなどという場合,この人には徘徊の危険性があります。

ヒント:

  • アルツハイマー病の人に動き回ってもらい,不安,焦燥的興奮,落ち着きのなさが緩和されるよう練習します。
  • アルツハイマー病の人の基本的ニーズ(トイレの使用,食事,喉の渇き)などが満たされることを確認しましょう。
  • 高齢者の安全を守るために,徘徊し,迷ってしまった高齢者の帰宅をサポートする全国規模の認証プログラムMedicAlert ® + Alzheimer's Association Safe Return ® へ登録しましょう。

運転

アルツハイマー病の人は信号を見落としたり,行き慣れた場所がわからなくなったり,ブレーキとアクセルを混同したりするようになることから,運転は安全性に関わる問題となります。 しかし,認知症にかかっている人は,運転すると言い張り,車の鍵を手放そうとしないこともあります。

ヒント:

  • 医師に「運転してはいけない」という処方を書いてもらいましょう
  • 車を目に見えないところに移動しましょう。 車を目にすることが,「運転するべき」という合図になってしまうことがあります。
  • ディストリビュータキャップやバッテリーを取り外し,車を運転不能にしましょう。
  • Driving Center (運転センター)にて,その他のヒントをご覧ください。

旅行中の安全

認知症の人との旅行には,皆が安全性と快適性,そして楽しさを感じられるよう,注意深い計画と柔軟さが必要とされます。

ヒント:

  • 日常性とかけ離れた日課ができる限り少なくなるよう,慣れた旅行先を選びましょう。
  • 認知症の人にとって旅行する最適な時間帯は日中です。
  • 航空機,空港,バスターミナル,ホテルのサービススタッフに,あなたは認知症の人と旅行しているため助けが必要となる場合があるということを伝えましょう。

災害への備え

ハリケーン(日本では台風),地震,あるいは火事といった災害は誰の安全にとっても多大なる影響がありますが,認知症の人は特に動揺し,混乱する場合があります。

ヒント:

  • 非難する場合を決めておきましょう。 家族の友人宅,ホテル,シェルターなどが選択肢となります。
  • 緊急や避難の際に移動しなくてはいけない場合のため,家族の電話番号を用意しておき,移動する度に家族に知らせましょう。
  • 重要な書類,余分な薬品,認知症の人を落ち着けたり注意を向けさせることのできるお気に入りのものなどを含めた緊急用キットを用意しておきましょう。

医薬品の安全

医薬品とその安全管理は,多くの高齢者にとって大きな懸念となっています。 アルツハイマー病の人々のために,医師はアルツハイマー病の症状や抑うつあるいは睡眠障害を緩和し,またはその他の健康状態を治療するための薬を処方することがあります。

ヒント:

  • 医師あるいは薬剤師に,すべての薬物を再吟味して可能性のある相互作用について確認するよう求めましょう。
  • 医師に相談する前に投薬量を変更してはいけません。
  • ピルケースを使用しましょう。 毎日のリストあるいはカレンダーを使用して,投薬毎にチェックマークをつけるのも役に立ちます。

次項: ストレスからの解放

Alzheimer's Association National Office 225 N. Michigan Ave., Fl. 17, Chicago, IL 60601
Alzheimer's Association is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

© 2018 Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.