Blog  Facebook  Twitter


Go to ALZ Site Español 中文 Chinese 日本語 Japanese 한국어 Korean Tiếng Việt Vietnamese About Us Contact Us Donate
Alzheimer's disease information and resources
24/7 helpline
800.272.3900
Share | Print
Text Size Small text Medium text Large text
10 Warning Signs
Why Get Checked
Behaviors
Find your chapter
Find your chapter
Search By State

Behaviors

Introduction
Aggression
Wandering
Anxiety or agitation
Confusion
Hallucinations
Repetition
Sundowning and sleep problems
Suspicion

Introduction

Alzheimer's causes changes in the brain that can change the way a person acts. Some individuals with Alzheimer's become anxious or aggressive. Others repeat certain questions and gestures. Many misinterpret what they see or hear. It is important to understand that the person is not acting this way on purpose or trying to annoy you.

Challenging behaviors can interfere with daily life, sleep and may lead to frustration and tension. The key to dealing with behaviors is: 1) determine the triggers 2) have patience and respond in a calm and supporting way and 3) find ways to prevent the behaviors from happening.

Aggression

Aggressive behaviors may be verbal (shouting, name-calling) or physical (hitting, pushing). They can occur suddenly, with no apparent reason, or can result from a frustrating situation. Whatever the case, it is important to try to understand what is causing the person to become angry or upset. Triggers for aggression can include a medical problem, a noisy environment or pain.

Wandering

It is common for individuals with dementia to wander and become lost. They often have a purpose or goal in mind, such as searching for a lost object, trying to fulfill a former job responsibility or wanting to "go home" even when at home. However, wandering can be dangerous, resulting in serious injury or death. Help keep your elder safe and enroll in MedicAlert ® + Alzheimer's Association Safe Return ®, a nationwide identification program designed to assist in the return of those who wander and become lost. See Safety Center to learn more about wandering and other safety issues.

Anxiety or agitation

The person may feel anxious or agitated, or may become restless and need to move around or pace. The person may become upset in certain places or focused on specific details. He or she may also cling to a certain caregiver for attention and direction.

Confusion

The person may not recognize familiar people, places or things. He or she may forget relationships, call family members by other names or become confused about where home is. The person may also forget the purpose of common items, such as a pen or a fork.

Hallucinations

When individuals with Alzheimer's disease have a hallucination, they see, hear, smell, taste or feel something that isn't there. The person may see the face of a former friend in a curtain or may hear people talking. If the hallucination doesn't cause problems, you may want to ignore it. However, if they happen continuously, see a doctor to determine if there is an underlying physical cause.

Repetition

The person with Alzheimer's may do or say something over and over again – like repeating a word, question or activity. In most cases, he or she is probably looking for comfort, security and familiarity. The person may also pace or undo what has just been finished. These actions are rarely harmful to the person with Alzheimer's but can be stressful for the caregiver.

Sundowning and sleep problems

The person may experience periods of increased confusion, anxiety and agitation beginning at dusk and continuing throughout the night. This is called sundowning. Experts are not sure what causes it, but there are factors that can contribute to the behavior, such as end-of-day exhaustion or less need for sleep, which is common among older adults.

Suspicion

Memory loss and confusion may cause the person with Alzheimer's to perceive things in new, unusual ways. Individuals may become suspicious of those around them, even accusing others of theft, infidelity or other improper behavior. Sometimes the person may also misinterpret what he or she sees and hears.


Next: 10 Warning Signs

はじめに
攻撃性
徘徊
不安または焦燥性興奮
混乱
幻覚
反復
日没症候群および睡眠障害
疑心

はじめに

アルツハイマー病は,脳に変化をもたらし個人の挙動に影響を与える認知症です。 アルツハイマー病では,不安や感情の動揺が強くなる場合があります。 あるいは,同じ質問や行動を繰り返すこともあります。 多くのアルツハイマー病の人々は,見たり聞いたりしたことを間違って理解することがあります。 大切なのは,アルツハイマー病の患者はこのような行為を故意にしているわけではないということ,または不愉快な思いをさせようと試みているわけではないことを理解することです。

問題行動は日常生活や睡眠に支障をきたし,苛立ちや緊張感に繋がることがあります。 このような行動に対処する鍵は: 1) 誘因を特定する,2) 忍耐力を持ち,落ち着き,サポートする態度で接する,3) 問題となる行為が起きないような方法を見つけることです。

攻撃性

攻撃的な行動とは,言葉によるもの(叫ぶ,悪態をつく)と,身体的なもの(叩く,押す)があります。 このような行為は,理由なく突然起きたり,あるいは苛立たしい状況の結果として起こる場合があります。 どちらの場合でも,なぜ怒ったり動転したりしているのかを理解することが大切です。 攻撃性の誘因には,医療的問題,騒がしい環境,苦痛などが含まれます。

徘徊

認知症者の間では,徘徊し,迷ってしまうことはよく起きる現象です。 彼らはこのような時,無くした物を探す,以前の仕事の役割を果たそうとする,あるいは自宅にいる場合でも「家に帰ろう」とするなどといった目的や目標を持った行動をすることがよくあります。 しかし,徘徊は危険であり,重傷を負ったり,また,死亡に繋がる恐れがあります。 高齢者の安全を守るために,徘徊し,迷ってしまった高齢者の帰宅をサポートする全国規模の認証プログラムMedicAlert ® + Alzheimer's Association Safe Return ®, への登録をお勧めします。 徘徊およびその他の安全問題に関する詳細は,Safety Center (安全センター) をご覧ください。

不安または焦燥性興奮

アルツハイマー病の人は,不安や焦燥性興奮を感じたり,または落ち着きをなくして動き回ったり歩き回ったりする場合があります。 特定の場所や,特定の細かい事柄に集中して動転することもあります。 特定の介護者からの注目と指示に執着することもあります。

混乱

親しい人々,場所,物事を認識しない場合があります。 関係を忘れ,家族を違う名前で呼んだり,自宅がどこかについて混乱し始めることがあります。 ペンやフォークといった一般的な物品について,その用途を忘れてしまう場合もあります。

幻覚

アルツハイマー病の人が幻覚を見る場合は,現実にはそこにないものを見たり,聞いたり,匂ったり,味わったり,感じたりします。 カーテンの陰に以前の友人の顔が見えたり,人々の話し声が聞こえたりすることもあります。 幻覚が問題を起こさない程度であれば,無視してよい場合もありますが ,これが連続的に起こる場合は,何か身体的な原因がないか医師による検診を受けてください。

反復

アルツハイマー病の人は,同じ言葉,質問,あるいは行動を何度も繰り返すことがあります。 ほとんどの場合,これは快適さ,安心感,親近感を求めているものと思われます。 歩き回ったり,たった今完了したことをやり直すこともあります。 このような行為はアルツハイマー病の人にとって危険である場合はほとんどありませんが,介護者にとってはストレスの一因となる場合があります。

日没症候群および睡眠障害

アルツハイマー病の人の混乱や不安,焦燥性興奮は,日没から夜の間に高まる場合があります。 これは日没症候群と呼ばれています。 専門家たちはその原因についてまだ究明していませんが,一日の疲れや睡眠の必要性の減少といった高齢者の間では一般的な特性が寄与していることも考えられます。

疑心

アルツハイマー病の人は,記憶の消失および混乱により,物事を新たな,また通常とは異なる方法で解釈することがあります。 周りの人に対し疑い深くなり,相手を泥棒,浮気者,またその他不適切な行動をしたと責めることもあります。 時には,見たり聞いたりしたことを間違って理解することもあります。


次項: 注意すべき10のサイン

Alzheimer's Association National Office 225 N. Michigan Ave., Fl. 17, Chicago, IL 60601
Alzheimer's Association is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

© 2018 Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.