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Connect with others 

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If someone you care about is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia, there is something you can do to help them and yourself. Plan to visit an Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver Support Group this month.

Monthly support

Groups offer vital links to other caregivers and an opportunity to learn more about caring for a loved one with dementia. Group members support and encourage each other while also exchanging practical information and resources.

Alzheimer's Association caregiver support groups are designed for the loved ones of individuals with dementia. 

Support groups meet monthly to provide caregivers with an opportunity to share their experiences and receive support from others coping with Alzheimer’s disease. There is no cost or commitment to attend. If you have questions about support groups in general, please call the Helpline at 800.272.3900. 

Find a support group

The Cleveland Area Chapter offers nearly 40 monthly Alzheimer's and dementia support groups in our five county service area.

Each group is facilitated by a trained volunteer and provides information and support for individuals caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias. 

Find a support group here. 

Enter your zip code in the event search and hit apply filters to find a local group near you. 

 

Support during COVID-19

We are committed to offering connection and support especially during the difficult season of the national pandemic. If you or a loved one needs support please join us for a support group hosted via telephone or zoom. Access 24/7 support via our free Helpline at 800.272.3900. 
Find a local virtual support group. 

Lead a support group 

We are always looking for volunteer support group facilitators. Learn more about becoming a support group facilitator
 

Online community

ALZConnected® is a free online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s or another dementia, including people with the disease and their caregivers, friends, family members and neighbors, as well as those who have lost someone to the disease.