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Spring/Summer 2015 Calendar

These programs are free and open to the public. Programs are subject to change and cancellation. Please call to register for all programs. For more information, or to register please call 800.272.3900 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. After 5 p.m. – call 973.586.4300 and leave a message!
 
Bergen-Essex-Hudson-Passaic-Union

Mercer-Middlesex-Monmouth-Ocean

Hunterdon-Morris-Somerset-Sussex-Warren

For information on program status during inclement weather, please call the main number (973.586.4300) – if our office is closed, dial extension 102

Bergen–Essex–Hudson–Passaic–Union


Alzheimer’s Disease: Approaches to Care
A Passaic County Caregiver Conference

This special half-day conference will include an overview of Alzheimer’s disease, including the diagnostic process, treatment, medications, and care techniques. Presentations will also address the importance of legal and financial planning, caregiver self-care and an in-depth overview of community resources that support both the individual with the disease and their caregiver.

View the program brochure.

Saturday, May 30, 2015. 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
WAYNE YMCA
1 Pike Drive, Wayne 

 

 

Living with Alzheimer’s for Caregivers: Middle Stage
In the Middle stage of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia disorders, gaps in memory and thinking begin to make it more difficult for the individual to manage the day-to-day activities like dressing, bathing and eating without assistance. Personality, behavior and sleep patterns also continue to change. Caregivers assume greater responsibility in managing not only the personal care and finances of the individual but also meeting the challenges of maintaining safety while creating a supportive environment.

Caregivers will learn more about symptoms and care needs; techniques for managing behaviors and maximizing safety; relationship changes and supportive services available to help with the caregiving responsibilities.

Part I: Monday, May 4, 2015 
Part II: Monday, May 11, 2015
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Secaucus Public Library
1379 Paterson Plank Road, Secaucus

 

Thursday, July 16 & 23, 2015. 
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Summit Medical Group
1 Diamond Hill Road, Berkeley Heights

 

 

Effective Communication Strategies
Communication is more than just talking and listening – it’s also about sending and receiving messages through attitude, tone of voice, facial expressions and body language. As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and other dementias progress and the ability to use words is lost, families need new ways to connect with their loved ones. Join us to explore how communication takes place when someone has Alzheimer’s, learn to decode the verbal and behavioral messages delivered by someone with dementia, and identify strategies to help you connect and communicate at each stage of the disease.

Thursday, June 4, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Christian Health Care Center
2000 Sienna Village, Wayne

 

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters
The warning signs of Alzheimer's disease are often dismissed as side effects of normal aging.  If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or changes in behavior or thinking skills, it's time to learn the facts.  Early detection, diagnosis and intervention are vital because they provide the best opportunities for treatment, support and planning for the future.

Attend this interactive workshop to learn the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. We’ll separate myth from reality and address commonly held fears about Alzheimer’s disease.

Thursday, May 28, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Montclair Public Library
50 South Fullerton Avenue, Montclair

 


Monday, July 13, 2015. 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Springfield Free Public Library
66 Mountain Avenue, Springfield Township

   


Understanding and Responding to Dementia Related Behavior
Behavior is a powerful form of communication and is one of the primary ways for people with dementia to communicate their needs and feelings as the ability to use language is lost. However, some behaviors can present real challenges for caregivers to manage. Join us to learn to decode behavioral messages, identify common behavior triggers, and learn strategies to help intervene with some of the most common behavioral challenges of Alzheimer’s disease.

Tuesday, June 23, 2015. 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
SAGE Eldercare
290 Broad Street, Summit
 


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Mercer–Middlesex–Monmouth–Ocean


Living with Alzheimer’s for Caregivers: Late Stage
This program is designed for caregivers of people in the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease, or for those who want to learn about what to expect in the late stages of the disease. In addition to gaining knowledge about changes that occur during Alzheimer’s disease progression, caregivers will learn how to:

  • Prepare for their evolving caregiver role
  • Work with the professional healthcare team
  • Anticipate changes in the physical, communicative and cognitive abilities that will eventually occur
The program will also cover how to address the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of the person with late-stage Alzheimer’s disease through care, communication, accessing resources, and working with healthcare professionals.
Mondays: June 8, 15, 22, 2015.  6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Monmouth Medical Center
300 Second Avenue, Long Branch
 

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters
The warning signs of Alzheimer's disease are often dismissed as side effects of normal aging.  If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or changes in behavior or thinking skills, it's time to learn the facts.  Early detection, diagnosis and intervention are vital because they provide the best opportunities for treatment, support and planning for the future.

Attend this interactive workshop to learn the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. We’ll separate myth from reality and address commonly held fears about Alzheimer’s disease.

Thursday, May 21, 2015. 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
West Windsor Branch - Mercer County Library System
333 North Post Rd, Princeton Junction

 


Saturday, May 30, 2015. 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Galilee Baptist Church
440 Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard, Trenton

 

 

The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia, and Alzheimer’s Disease 
This program is designed to provide basic information about memory loss issues and what they mean for all of us.  The different types of dementia, risk factors, obtaining a diagnosis, current research, and planning for the future will be discussed.

Thursday, May 28, 2014. 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
The Chelsea at Brick Assisted Living
458 Jack Martin Blvd, Brick

 


Wednesday, June 3, 2015. 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Presbyterian Church on the Hill
10 Cold Indian Spring Road, Ocean Township 

 

 

Effective Communication Strategies
Communication is more than just talking and listening – it’s also about sending and receiving messages through attitude, tone of voice, facial expressions and body language. As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and other dementias progress and the ability to use words is lost, families need new ways to connect with their loved ones. Join us to explore how communication takes place when someone has Alzheimer’s, learn to decode the verbal and behavioral messages delivered by someone with dementia, and identify strategies to help you connect and communicate at each stage of the disease.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015. 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
RWJ Fitness & Wellness Center
3100 Quakerbridge Road, Hamilton Township
 


Dementia Conversations
When someone is showing signs of dementia, it’s time to talk.  The Alzheimer’s Association Conversations about Dementia program is designed to help you talk with your family about some challenging and often uncomfortable topics around Alzheimer’s and dementia. Some of the most difficult conversations to have are about:

  • Going to the doctor to get a diagnosis or medical care,
  • Deciding when it is necessary to stop driving, and
  • Making plans for managing finances and legal documents to be sure the person’s wishes are carried out and the costs of future care are covered.

You may try to wait until the time is “right” to have these conversations, but in reality, that time rarely comes. The sooner these discussions can take place, the better, so you can include the person about whom you have concerns and avoid unexpected situations in the future.  Join us and learn some tips for breaking the ice and setting the stage for meaningful and productive conversations about dementia.

Sunday, June 14, 2015. 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
New Covenant United Methodist Church
1965 S Broad St, Trenton
 

Wednesday, June 17, 2015. 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Monroe Township Senior Center
12 Halsey Reed Road, Monroe Township
 » To register, please call: 609.448.7140


Understanding Memory Loss
Memory loss that disrupts everyday life is not a normal part of aging. This program will explore the difference between normal age-related memory changes and abnormal changes that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia disorders, including the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. The presentation will discuss the importance of receiving a thorough diagnostic evaluation when symptoms first arise, current treatment options, and research advances.

Wednesday, June 10, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
John F. Kennedy Library
500 Hoes Lane, Piscataway
 


Residential Care Options: Finding the Right Fit for Your Family 
Determining when it is time to make a transition from home to a residential care setting is not an easy decision.  This program is designed to guide caregivers through the process of selecting the most appropriate care setting for their family member, providing an overview of the options and highlighting factors to consider when choosing this new home.  The session also emphasizes the legal and financial considerations associated with moving an individual to a residential care setting.  Many emotions may accompany this decision and important techniques for making the adjustment easier for the person with Alzheimer’s disease as well as other members of the family will be shared.  

Tuesday, June 30, 2015. 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Visiting HomeCare Service of Ocean County
105 Sunset Avenue, Toms River
 


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Hunterdon–Morris–Somerset–Sussex–Warren


Effective Communication Strategies
Communication is more than just talking and listening – it’s also about sending and receiving messages through attitude, tone of voice, facial expressions and body language. As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and other dementias progress and the ability to use words is lost, families need new ways to connect with their loved ones. Join us to explore how communication takes place when someone has Alzheimer’s, learn to decode the verbal and behavioral messages delivered by someone with dementia, and identify strategies to help you connect and communicate at each stage of the disease.

Refreshments will be provided by Seniors Helping Seniors.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
The Library of the Chathams
214 Main Street, Chatham
 

 

Understanding and Responding to Dementia Related Behavior
Behavior is a powerful form of communication and is one of the primary ways for people with dementia to communicate their needs and feelings as the ability to use language is lost. However, some behaviors can present real challenges for caregivers to manage. Join us to learn to decode behavioral messages, identify common behavior triggers, and learn strategies to help intervene with some of the most common behavioral challenges of Alzheimer’s disease.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015. 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Victorian Garden Adult Day Care
353 Main Street, Chatham
 

Monday, June 15, 2015. 2 p.m. – 3  p.m.
The House of the Good Shepard
798 Willow Grove Street, Hackettstown
 

Tuesday, June 16, 2015.  1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
RWJ Physician Enterprise – Urgent Care
751 Route 206, Suite 100, Hillsborough
 

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters 
The warning signs of Alzheimer's disease are often dismissed as side effects of normal aging.  If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or changes in behavior or thinking skills, it's time to learn the facts.  Early detection, diagnosis and intervention are vital because they provide the best opportunities for treatment, support and planning for the future.

Attend this interactive workshop to learn the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. We’ll separate myth from reality and address commonly held fears about Alzheimer’s disease.

Thursday, May 21, 2015. 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.
Madison Area YMCA
111 Kings Road, Madison
 

Monday, June 8, 2015. 4 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Hackettstown Free Public Library
110 Church Street, Hackettstown
 

Tuesday, June 23, 2015. 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Bernardsville Public Library
1 Anderson Hill Road, Bernardsville
 
 

Living with Alzheimer’s for Caregivers: Early Stage
Early-stage Alzheimer’s is the beginning stage of the disease when changes in memory, thinking, and communication become noticeable.  Individuals may have difficulty completing complex tasks and require more time to complete normal daily tasks. Family caregivers can adjust to living with Alzheimer’s disease through an understanding of early-stage symptoms, making adaptations in daily living routines and roles, and planning for future changes and needs. This program will offer information for caregivers about adjusting to the diagnosis, developing a care team, accessing community supports and resources, and making legal, financial, and safety plans for the future.

Tuesday, May 12 & 19, 2015.  6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Newton Medical Center
The Romano Conference Center – Room 6
175 High Street, Newton

 

Coping with Caregiver Stress
Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia can become an overwhelming experience.  Often, caregivers neglect their own well-being because they are devoting so much time to the responsibilities of day-to-day caregiving. This program will examine caregiver stress and offer coping strategies to become a healthier caregiver. The value of assembling a care team and the importance of setting realistic expectations for caregiving are topics that will be explored.

Monday, May 18, 2015. 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
VNA of Somerset Hills
200 Mt. Airy Road, Basking Ridge

 

 

Living with Alzheimer’s for Caregivers: Middle Stage 
In the Middle stage of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia disorders, gaps in memory and thinking begin to make it more difficult for the individual to manage the day-to-day activities like dressing, bathing and eating without assistance.  Personality, behavior and sleep patterns also continue to change.  Caregivers assume greater responsibility in managing not only the personal care and finances of the individual but also meeting the challenges of maintaining safety while creating a supportive environment.
Caregivers will learn more about symptoms and care needs; techniques for managing behaviors and maximizing safety; relationship changes and supportive services available to help with the caregiving responsibilities.

Thursdays: June 11, 18, & 25, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Newton Medical Center
The Romano Conference Center – Room 6
175 High Street, Newton
 

Healthy Habits for a Healthier You
For centuries, we’ve known that the health of the brain and the body are connected. But now, science is able to provide insights into how to optimize our physical and cognitive health as we age.

Join us to learn about research in the areas of diet and nutrition, exercise, cognitive activity and social engagement, and use hands-on tools to help you incorporate these recommendations into a plan for healthy aging.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015. 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Center for Healthier Living — Hackettstown Regional Medical Center
108 Bilby Road, Suite 101, Hackettstown
 


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Alzheimer's Association

Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's
Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research.