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Summer/Fall 2015 Calendar

These programs are free and open to the public. Programs are subject to change and cancellation. Please call to register for all programs. For more information, or to register please call 800.272.3900 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. After 5 p.m. – call 973.586.4300 and leave a message!

Bergen-Essex-Hudson-Passaic-Union

Mercer-Middlesex-Monmouth-Ocean

Hunterdon-Morris-Somerset-Sussex-Warren

 

For information on program status during inclement weather, please call the main number: 973.586.4300. (If the office is closed, dial extension 102)


Bergen–Essex–Hudson–Passaic–Union


The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia, and Alzheimer’s Disease
This program is designed to provide basic information about memory loss issues and what they mean for all of us. The different types of dementia, risk factors, obtaining a diagnosis, current research, and planning for the future will be discussed.

Monday, August 17, 2015. 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.
Union City Public Library
324-43rd Street, Union City

Monday, September 28, 2015. 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Free Public Library of Hasbrouck Heights
320 Boulevard, Hasbrouck Heights

 

Coping with Caregiver Stress 
Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia can become an overwhelming experience.  Often, caregivers neglect their own well-being because they are devoting so much time to the responsibilities of day-to-day caregiving. This program will examine caregiver stress and offer coping strategies to become a healthier caregiver. The value of assembling a care team and the importance of setting realistic expectations for caregiving are topics that will be explored.

Tuesday, August 4, 2015. 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
CareOne at Ridgewood Avenue
100 West Ridgewood Avenue, Paramus

 

Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease and Current Treatment Approaches
Alzheimer’s disease is life changing for both the diagnosed individual, as well as their families and caregivers. As the disease progresses, people experience considerable changes with memory, abilities, judgement and behavior. While there is no cure for Alzheimer’s, taking full advantage of available treatment, care and support resources can help those affected by the disease. This special program will include an overview of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia disorders, including the diagnostic process, available medical treatments, and care techniques. We will conclude the program with an overview of helpful resources that are available to support both the caregiver, as well as the person with the disease.

Speaker:
Shira Goldberg, MD
Barnabas Health Medical Group
Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Care

A Dinner with the Doctor Program (a light dinner will be served).

Thursday, September 17, 2015.  6 – 8 p.m.
Barnabas Health Hospice – Corporate Building
95 Old Short Hills Road, West Orange

 

Dementia Conversations
When someone is showing signs of dementia, it’s time to talk.  The Alzheimer’s Association Conversations about Dementia program is designed to help you talk with your family about some challenging and often uncomfortable topics around Alzheimer’s and dementia. Some of the most difficult conversations to have are about:

  • Going to the doctor to get a diagnosis or medical care,
  • Deciding when it is necessary to stop driving, and
  • Making plans for managing finances and legal documents to be sure the person’s wishes are carried out and the costs of future care are covered.

You may try to wait until the time is “right” to have these conversations, but in reality, that time rarely comes. The sooner these discussions can take place, the better, so you can include the person about whom you have concerns and avoid unexpected situations in the future.  Join us and learn some tips for breaking the ice and setting the stage for meaningful and productive conversations about dementia.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Crane's Mill – Hinman Hall
459 Passaic Avenue, West Caldwell

 

Effective Communication Strategies
Communication is more than just talking and listening – it’s also about sending and receiving messages through attitude, tone of voice, facial expressions and body language. As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and other dementias progress and the ability to use words is lost, families need new ways to connect with their loved ones. Join us to explore how communication takes place when someone has Alzheimer’s, learn to decode the verbal and behavioral messages delivered by someone with dementia, and identify strategies to help you connect and communicate at each stage of the disease.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015. 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Oradell Health Care Center
600 Kinderkamack Road, Oradell

 

Understanding and Responding to Dementia Related Behavior 
Behavior is a powerful form of communication and is one of the primary ways for people with dementia to communicate their needs and feelings as the ability to use language is lost. However, some behaviors can present real challenges for caregivers to manage. Join us to learn to decode behavioral messages, identify common behavior triggers, and learn strategies to help intervene with some of the most common behavioral challenges of Alzheimer’s disease.

Tuesday, October 27, 2015. 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Daughters of Miriam Center – The Gallen Institute
155 Hazel Street, Clifton

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters
The warning signs of Alzheimer's disease are often dismissed as side effects of normal aging. If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or changes in behavior or thinking skills, it's time to learn the facts. Early detection, diagnosis and intervention are vital because they provide the best opportunities for treatment, support and planning for the future.

Attend this interactive workshop to learn the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. We’ll separate myth from reality and address commonly held fears about Alzheimer’s disease.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015. 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Jefferson Township Public Library
1031 Weldon Road, Oak Ridge

 

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Mercer–Middlesex–Monmouth–Ocean


Coping with Caregiver Stress 
Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia can become an overwhelming experience.  Often, caregivers neglect their own well-being because they are devoting so much time to the responsibilities of day-to-day caregiving. This program will examine caregiver stress and offer coping strategies to become a healthier caregiver. The value of assembling a care team and the importance of setting realistic expectations for caregiving are topics that will be explored.

Tuesday, August 25, 2015. 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
Middletown Township Senior Center
900 Leonardville Road, Leonardo


Effective Communication Strategies
Communication is more than just talking and listening – it’s also about sending and receiving messages through attitude, tone of voice, facial expressions and body language. As the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and other dementias progress and the ability to use words is lost, families need new ways to connect with their loved ones. Join us to explore how communication takes place when someone has Alzheimer’s, learn to decode the verbal and behavioral messages delivered by someone with dementia, and identify strategies to help you connect and communicate at each stage of the disease.

Thursday, August 6, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
The Chelsea at Toms River
1657 Silverton Road, Toms River

 

Living with Alzheimer’s for Caregivers: Late Stage
This program is designed for caregivers of people in the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease, or for those who want to learn about what to expect in the late stages of the disease. In addition to gaining knowledge about changes that occur during Alzheimer’s disease progression, caregivers will learn how to:

  • Prepare for their evolving caregiver role
  • Work with the professional healthcare team
  • Anticipate changes in the physical, communicative and cognitive abilities that will eventually occur

The program will also cover how to address the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of the person with late-stage Alzheimer’s disease through care, communication, accessing resources, and working with healthcare professionals.

Thursdays: August 20 & 27, 2015. 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Community Medical Center – Auditorium B
99 Route 37 West, Toms River

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters
The warning signs of Alzheimer's disease are often dismissed as side effects of normal aging. If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or changes in behavior or thinking skills, it's time to learn the facts. Early detection, diagnosis and intervention are vital because they provide the best opportunities for treatment, support and planning for the future.

Attend this interactive workshop to learn the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. We’ll separate myth from reality and address commonly held fears about Alzheimer’s disease.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015. 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Raritan Valley YMCA
144 Tices Lane, East Brunswick


Wednesday, August 19, 2015.  7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Old Bridge Public Library
1 Old Bridge Plaza, Old Bridge

Thursday, October 22, 2015. 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Meridian Community Resource Center
Freehold Raceway Mall – Level 1, Parking P4
3710 Route 9, Freehold

 

Living with Alzheimer’s for Caregivers: Middle Stage
In the Middle stage of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia disorders, gaps in memory and thinking begin to make it more difficult for the individual to manage the day-to-day activities like dressing, bathing and eating without assistance. Personality, behavior and sleep patterns also continue to change. Caregivers assume greater responsibility in managing not only the personal care and finances of the individual but also meeting the challenges of maintaining safety while creating a supportive environment.

Caregivers will learn more about symptoms and care needs; techniques for managing behaviors and maximizing safety; relationship changes and supportive services available to help with the caregiving responsibilities.

Thursdays: October 1, 8 & 15, 2015. 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Monmouth Medical Center – Southern Campus
600 River Avenue, Lakewood

Mondays: October 19, 26, November 2, 2015. 5 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Howell Senior Center
251 Preventorium Road (behind Police Dept. in old Town Hall complex), Howell


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Hunterdon–Morris–Somerset–Sussex–Warren


Dementia Conversations
When someone is showing signs of dementia, it’s time to talk.  The Alzheimer’s Association Conversations about Dementia program is designed to help you talk with your family about some challenging and often uncomfortable topics around Alzheimer’s and dementia. Some of the most difficult conversations to have are about: Going to the doctor to get a diagnosis or medical care, deciding when it is necessary to stop driving, and making plans for managing finances and legal documents to be sure the person’s wishes are carried out and the costs of future care are covered.

You may try to wait until the time is “right” to have these conversations, but in reality, that time rarely comes. The sooner these discussions can take place, the better, so you can include the person about whom you have concerns and avoid unexpected situations in the future.  Join us and learn some tips for breaking the ice and setting the stage for meaningful and productive conversations about dementia.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Arden Courts of Whippany
18 Eden Lane, Whippany
 

Understanding Memory Loss 
Memory loss that disrupts everyday life is not a normal part of aging. This program will explore the difference between normal age-related memory changes and abnormal changes that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia disorders, including the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. The presentation will discuss the importance of receiving a thorough diagnostic evaluation when symptoms first arise, current treatment options, and research advances.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015. 10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Hillsboro Senior Center
339 South Branch Road, Hillsborough Township

 

Know the 10 Signs: Early Detection Matters
The warning signs of Alzheimer's disease are often dismissed as side effects of normal aging. If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or changes in behavior or thinking skills, it's time to learn the facts. Early detection, diagnosis and intervention are vital because they provide the best opportunities for treatment, support and planning for the future.

Attend this interactive workshop to learn the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. We’ll separate myth from reality and address commonly held fears about Alzheimer’s disease.

Friday, October 2, 2015.  2 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Pequannock Township Public Library
477 Newark Pompton Turnpike, Pompton Plains

 

Healthy Habits for a Healthier You
For centuries, we’ve known that the health of the brain and the body are connected. But now, science is able to provide insights into how to optimize our physical and cognitive health as we age.

Join us to learn about research in the areas of diet and nutrition, exercise, cognitive activity and social engagement, and use hands-on tools to help you incorporate these recommendations into a plan for healthy aging.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015. 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Center for Healthier Living
Hackettstown Regional Medical Center
108 Bilby Road, Suite 101, Hackettstown

Wednesday, August 26, 2015. 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Quail Brook Senior Center
625 New Brunswick Road, Somerset

 

Living with Alzheimer’s for Caregivers: Middle Stage 
In the Middle stage of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia disorders, gaps in memory and thinking begin to make it more difficult for the individual to manage the day-to-day activities like dressing, bathing and eating without assistance. Personality, behavior and sleep patterns also continue to change. Caregivers assume greater responsibility in managing not only the personal care and finances of the individual but also meeting the challenges of maintaining safety while creating a supportive environment.

Caregivers will learn more about symptoms and care needs; techniques for managing behaviors and maximizing safety; relationship changes and supportive services available to help with the caregiving responsibilities.

Thursday, November 12 & 19, 2015. 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Morristown Medical Center
3rd Floor Conference Room, Ambulatory Care Building
100 Madison Avenue, Morristown

Living with Alzheimer’s for Caregivers: Late Stage
This program is designed for caregivers of people in the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease, or for those who want to learn about what to expect in the late stages of the disease. In addition to gaining knowledge about changes that occur during Alzheimer’s disease progression, caregivers will learn how to:

  • Prepare for their evolving caregiver role
  • Work with the professional healthcare team
  • Anticipate changes in the physical, communicative and cognitive abilities that will eventually occur

The program will also cover how to address the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of the person with late-stage Alzheimer’s disease through care, communication, accessing resources, and working with healthcare professionals.

Thursdays: September 10 &17, 2015. 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Newton Medical Center
The Romano Conference Center – Room 6
175 High Street, Newton

Tuesdays: December 8 & 15, 2015. 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Morristown Medical Center
3rd Floor Conference Room, Ambulatory Care Building
100 Madison Avenue, Morristown

The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia, and Alzheimer’s Disease
This program is designed to provide basic information about memory loss issues and what they mean for all of us. The different types of dementia, risk factors, obtaining a diagnosis, current research, and planning for the future will be discussed.

Saturday, September 19, 2015. 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Church of the Saviour
155 Morris Avenue, Denville

 

Understanding and Responding to Dementia Related Behavior 
Behavior is a powerful form of communication and is one of the primary ways for people with dementia to communicate their needs and feelings as the ability to use language is lost. However, some behaviors can present real challenges for caregivers to manage. Join us to learn to decode behavioral messages, identify common behavior triggers, and learn strategies to help intervene with some of the most common behavioral challenges of Alzheimer’s disease.

Wednesday, October 21, 2015. 5:30 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Hunterdon Medical Center – Meeting Room A/E
2100 Wescott Drive, Flemington



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For information on program status during inclement weather, please call the main number: 973.586.4300. (If the office is closed, dial extension 102)

 


 

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Alzheimer's Association

Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's
Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research.