Join
Home | News | Events | Press | Contact  

About UseNewsletterMessage BoardsAction CenterAdvocateWalk to End Alzheimer’sShopDonate

Find your chapter:

search by state

In My Community
Welcome to the Alzheimer's Association - Greater Pennsylvania Chapter

 

Love Your Brain During June.

Your brain is your command center and deserves as much attention as the rest of your body.  Research show that YOU can reduce your risk of cognitive decline by making key lifestyle changes.


10 Ways to Love Your Brain

1. Break a sweat. Engage in regular cardiovascular exercise that elevates your heart rate and increases blood flow to the brain and body. Several studies have found an association between physical activity and reduced risk of cognitive decline.

2. Hit the books. Formal education in any stage of life will help reduce your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. For example, take a class at a local college, community center or online.

3. Butt out. Evidence shows that smoking increases risk of cognitive decline. Quitting smoking can reduce that risk to levels comparable to those who have not smoked.

4. Follow your heart. Evidence shows that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and stroke – obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes – negatively impact your cognitive health. Take care of your heart, and your brain just might follow.


5. Heads up! Brain injury can raise your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Wear a seat belt, use a helmet when playing contact sports or riding a bike, and take steps to prevent falls.

6. Fuel up right. Eat a healthy and balanced diet that is lower in fat and higher in vegetables and fruit to help reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Although research on diet and cognitive function is limited, certain diets, including Mediterranean and Mediterranean-DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), may contribute to risk reduction.

7. Catch some Zzz’s. Not getting enough sleep due to conditions like insomnia or sleep apnea may result in problems with memory and thinking.

8. Take care of your mental health. Some studies link a history of depression with increased risk of cognitive decline, so seek medical treatment if you have symptoms of depression, anxiety or other mental health concerns. Also, try to manage stress.

9. Buddy up. Staying socially engaged may support brain health. Pursue social activities that are meaningful to you. Find ways to be part of your local community – if you love animals, consider volunteering at a local shelter. If you enjoy singing, join a local choir or help at an afterschool program. Or, just share activities with friends and family.

10. Stump yourself. Challenge and activate your mind. Build a piece of furniture. Complete a jigsaw puzzle. Do something artistic. Play games, such as bridge, that make you think strategically. Challenging your mind may have short and long-term benefits for your brain.


   



24-hour Helpline 800-272-3900

The Helpline can accommodate more than 200 languages and dialects.

 

    


 

National Alzheimer's Project

The Alzheimer’s crisis is growing rapidly. It is a heartbreaking disease. It is terminal and currently unstoppable. And it is tremendously costly, both to American families and the nation as a whole.
Get Informed - Get Active

For Healthcare Professionals

Get easy access to a comprehensive listing of Alzheimer's and dementia resources, community programs and services.
Community Resource Finder

EARLY STAGE ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

The Alzheimer’s Association is committed to providing opportunities for early-stage individuals to make meaningful contributions social, politically, culturally and in other ways that bring purpose to their lives.
Find out More

TrialMatch, a free service that makes it easy for people with Alzheimer's, caregivers, families and physicians to locate clinical trials based on personal criteria (diagnosis, stage of disease) and location.
Find out more


MAKE A DIFFERENCE


Donate
Your gift today will make a difference in the lives of people facing Alzheimer's.

Become an advocate
Speak out for people affected by Alzheimer's disease.

 

Join or start a team today.

Find a Walk

Washington Alaska Texas Washington Oregon California Idaho Nevada Arizona Utah Montana Wyoming Colorado New Mexico Oklahoma Kansas Nebraska South Dakota North Dakota Minnesota Iowa Missouri Arkansas Louisiana Mississippi Illinois Wisconsin Michigan Indiana Kentucky Tennessee Alabama Florida Georgia South Carolina North Carolina Virginia West Virginia Ohio Maine Pennsylvania New York Vermont New Hampshire Massachusetts Rhode Island Connecticut New Jersey onClick= Delaware Maryland Hawaii Vermont New Hampshire Massachusetts Rhode Island Connecticut New Jersey Delaware Maryland Washington D.C.
Alzheimer's Association

Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's
Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research.