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Funded Studies 2005-2013


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Funded Studies: 2005–2013


Grants Overview Types of Grants Process and Timeline Funded Studies

Abstracts by year


2013 grants:

By investigator

By country

2012 grants:

By investigator

By country

2011 grants:

By investigator

By country

2010 grants:

By investigator

By country

2009 grants:

By investigator

By country

2008 grants:

By investigator

By country

2007 grants:

By investigator

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2006 grants:

By investigator

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2005 grants:

By investigator

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2013 portfolio summary


In 2013 the Alzheimer’s Association made investments totaling approximately $14.8 million in more than 75 scientific investigations. These include grant awards to 66 projects funded through its International Research Grant Program (IRGP), representing proposals ranked highest by peer-reviewers in an extremely competitive field of 605 applications (invited from over 1,000 LOIs), and strategic research initiatives.

Since 1982 the Alzheimer’s Association has invested over $315 million in more than 2,200 scientific investigations. As of August 2013, more than 350 of these investigations are on-going in 22 countries.

  • 47 percent of the funded projects are exploring the molecular mechanisms that contribute to disease-related processes including the production of beta-amyloid, the mediators of beta-amyloid’s toxicity and its adverse effect on cell-to-cell communication, the abnormal chemical alterations of tau, and the normal functions of related proteins implicated in Alzheimer’s disease pathology. These projects may also examine the cellular properties and functions that normally protect and maintain neurons in the brain.
  • 6 percent of the projects are examining various factors that may contribute to Alzheimer’s and other dementias, including blood vessel damage and genetic risk factors.
  • 23 percent of the projects are investigating brain imaging, biomarkers, and clinical tools that may result in earlier and more accurate diagnoses, timelier interventions, and effective disease monitoring.
  • 20 percent of the projects are exploring novel treatment strategies, non-pharmacological interventions, ways to improve care for people with dementia through new technologies, and the values and beliefs of diverse cultures that impact the use of health services.
  • 4 percent of the projects are studying ways to improve care for people with dementia through new technologies and exploring the values and beliefs of diverse cultures that impact the use of health services.

 

2012 portfolio summary


In 2012, the Alzheimer’s Association International Research Grant Program awarded approximately $12.2 million in funding to 78 scientific investigations. Of these, 74 funded projects represent  proposals ranked highest by peer reviewers in an extremely competitive field of 922 applications. In addition to funding individual scientists in 8 grant categories, the Alzheimer’s Association awarded 4 special scientific projects . Since 1982, the Alzheimer’s Association has committed over $315 million to more than 2,200 scientific investigations around the world.

  • 32 percent of projects funded in 2012 explore the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the production of beta-amyloid, the mediators of beta-amyloid’s toxicity, and its adverse effect on cell-to-cell communication. 
  • 27 percent investigate the abnormal chemical alterations of tau and the normal functions of related proteins implicated in Alzheimer’s pathology, as well as the cellular properties and functions that normally protect and maintain neurons in the brain.
  • 7 percent examine other factors that may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, including blood vessel damage and genetic risk factors.
  • 12 percent investigate brain imaging, biomarkers and clinical tools that may result in earlier and more accurate diagnoses, timely interventions and effective disease monitoring.
  • 12 percent explore novel treatment strategies and non-pharmacological interventions.
  • 10 percent study ways to improve care for people with dementia through new technologies and explore the values and beliefs of diverse cultures that impact use of health services.

 

2011 portfolio summary


In 2011, the Alzheimer's Association International Research Grant Program awarded more than $12.8 million in funding to 78 investigators. Funded projects represent the proposals ranked highest by peer reviewers in an extremely competitive field of 875 applications. Since 1982, the Alzheimer's Association has committed over $315 million to more than 2,200 best-of-field grant proposals.

  • 19 percent of projects funded in 2011 explore the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the production of beta-amyloid, the mediators of beta-amyloid's toxicity, and its adverse effect on cell-to-cell communication. 
  • 36 percent investigate the abnormal chemical alterations of tau and the normal functions of related proteins implicated in Alzheimer's pathology, as well as the cellular properties and functions that normally protect and maintain neurons in the brain.
  • 14 percent examine other factors that may contribute to Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, including blood vessel damage and genetic risk factors.
  • 9 percent investigate brain imaging, biomarkers and clinical tools that may result in earlier and more accurate diagnoses, timely interventions and effective disease monitoring.
  • 18 percent explore novel treatment strategies and non-pharmacological interventions.
  • 4 percent study ways to improve care for people with dementia through new technologies and explore the values and beliefs of diverse cultures that impact use of health services.

In 2011, the Department of Defense (DoD) received a $15 million appropriation to support research associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias, including research associated with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and the development of strategies dedicated to improving the quality of life for those affected by AD. Because of the tight timeline, the DoD worked closely with the Alzheimer’s Association to identify investigations that met their criteria, as well as the stringent peer-review criteria used by the Alzheimer’s Association. A selection of projects was invited to submit to in-house experts at the DoD’s TATRC for panel review and funding recommendation. Seven proposals were recommended for funding based on the scores and merits of each proposal.


2010 portfolio summary


The Alzheimer's Association 2010 grants portfolio supports the 84 projects ranked highest by peer reviewers in an extremely competitive field of 740 applications. Key 2010 research themes include:

  • 22 percent of projects funded in 2010 explore the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the production of beta-amyloid, the abnormal chemical alterations of tau and the normal functions of related proteins implicated in Alzheimer pathology.
  • 36 percent investigate the underlying pathology of Alzheimer's, including the effect of beta-amyloid, mediators of toxicity, the adverse effect of beta-amyloid on cell-to-cell communication, and the effect of Alzheimer's disease on
    cellular properties and functions that normally protect and maintain neurons in the brain.
  • 5 percent examine other factors that may contribute to Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, including blood vessel damage and genetic risk factors.
  • 7 percent investigate brain imaging, biomarkers and clinical tools that may result in earlier and more accurate diagnoses, timely interventions and effective disease monitoring.
  • 22 percent explore novel treatment strategies and the improvement of clinical trial designs.
  • 8 percent study improving care for people with dementia through new technologies, and exploring the values and beliefs of diverse cultures that impact use of health services.

2009 portfolio summary


The Alzheimer's Association 2009 grants portfolio supports the 84 projects ranked highest by peer reviewers in an extremely competitive field of 815 applications. Key 2009 research themes include:

  • 24 percent of projects funded in 2009 explore the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the production of beta-amyloid, the abnormal chemical alterations of tau and the normal functions of related proteins implicated in Alzheimer's pathology.
  • 26 percent investigate the underlying pathology of Alzheimer's, including the effect of beta-amyloid, mediators of toxicity, the adverse effect of beta-amyloid on cell-to-cell communication, and the effect of Alzheimer's disease on cellular properties and functions that normally protect and maintain neurons in the brain.
  • 7 percent examine other factors that may contribute to Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, including blood vessel damage and genetic risk factors.
  • 22 percent investigate brain imaging, biomarkers and clinical tools that may result in earlier and more accurate diagnoses, timely interventions and effective disease monitoring.
  • 10 percent explore novel treatment strategies and the improvement of clinical trial designs.
  • 11 percent study improving care for people with dementia through new technologies, and exploring the values and beliefs of diverse cultures that impact use of health services.

2008 portfolio summary


The Alzheimer's Association 2008 grants portfolio supports the 131 projects ranked highest by peer reviewers in an extremely competitive field of 599 applications. Key 2008 research themes include:

  • 14 percent of projects funded in 2008 explore the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the production of beta-amyloid, the abnormal chemical alterations of tau and the normal functions of related proteins implicated in Alzheimer's pathology.
  • 11 percent investigate the toxic properties of beta-amyloid, mediators of this toxicity and the adverse effect of beta-amyloid on cell-to-cell communication.
  • 14 percent study the effect of Alzheimer's disease on cellular properties and functions that normally protect and maintain neurons in the brain.
  • 17 percent examine other factors that may contribute to Alzheimer's disease, including inflammation, blood vessel damage, nutritional deficits, genetic risk factors and lifestyle factors.
  • 11 percent investigate brain imaging, biomarkers and clinical tools that may result in earlier and more accurate diagnoses, timely interventions and effective disease monitoring.
  • 18 percent explore novel treatment strategies, including anti-amyloid compounds and nutritional therapies.
  • 15 percent study best practices in care for people with dementia living in nursing homes, in assisted-living communities and at home.